Fresh and Firry: Christmas Tree Health

Ah, yes. The annual Christmas Fir.

Whether you have your tree picked and decorated, or you still have yet to locate one, here are some more tips* to keep your Christmas tree healthy through the holidays …and avoid an untimely demise!

*Christmas Tree tips brought to you by The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Buying Your Tree

  • If possible, buy a freshly-cut tree from a reputable nursery or cut your own. (Many trees that are for sale now were cut weeks ago.)
  • If you’re buying a tree that can be replanted later, keep in mind that a very small percentage of these trees survive after being indoors in the winter. Freshly-cut Christmas trees are farmed specifically for their purpose and support local agriculture.
  • If there are lots of needles on the ground around the trees, go elsewhere. To check a tree’s freshness, pull your hand towards you along the branch. Needles should not fall off.
  • If you want to keep your Christmas tree potted and in the house after Christmas, a Norfolk Island pine would be the best choice.

 Tree TLC

  • When you bring your tree home, saw a couple inches off the bottom of the trunk before setting in water. When trees are cut, pitch oozes out and seals the pores. By sawing off the base, you will open up the pores, and the tree will be able to absorb water.
  • Watering is critical. A freshly-cut tree can consume a gallon of water in 24 hours!  (Definitely check out these clever and fun watering systems)
  • Fill the tree stand with water and keep it filled.
  • Never let the water level go below the tree’s base.
  • Indoors, keep the tree away from heating ducts or other heat sources. In fact, the lower the temperature, the better the tree will do.
  • Some people add aspirin or sugar to the water; we can’t say whether either helps. Again, water is the vital element.
Follow these tips, and keep your tree healthy throughout the New Year, too!

(Should've followed Petal Press, Charlie Brown.)

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